Phone Story banned by Apple

I came across an interesting article about a game made by a company called Molleindustria which consists of four mini games and goes through the life cycle of your typical mobile phone. This game was released on the iPhone but Apple decided that the consumers of their products were to delicate to handle the truth behind the products they peddle out to their fans so they banned it.

I won’t go into to many details as the original article at Kotaku which I came across covers it better than I could but the four mini games cover:

  1. Coltan mining in the Congo.
  2. The manufacturing workers conditions at Foxconn.
  3. The obsolescence driven culture of want.
  4. The toxic e-waste generated by the disposal of the phone.

You can also access a video of the game via Youtube.

Just remember that rampart, unchecked consumerism is good for you, otherwise Apple would never have banned the game in the first place.

Forcing Delivery of Specific EMails with sendmail

I recently had some fun with sendmail. Yes, there are companies out there who still use it.

The fun I had was that our upstream MX for the internal sendmail hosts were blocking us for spam. This was due to a bulkmail mail sent out to 22500 people. Who would have thought that 22500 EMails being sent within 20 minutes would be considered as spam?

Anyway, once the upstream MX was dealt with and stopped blocking us, we had the need to force through the delivery of a handful of VIP EMails and the last time I had used sendmail was a good 4 years ago and I could not remember off the top of my head the command to force a specific EMail through but remembered that you could. Don’t you hate that?

After some searching, I found that the command to force a specific EMail to deliver out of the thousands that currently exist in the queue is:

sendmail -v -o MinQueueAge=0 -qI<mailq id>

To find all the EMails sent by the person in question, you just need to go to the mqueue directory and grep the EMail address out of the qf files:

cd /var/spool/mqueue
grep <email address> qf*

With the list of files returned by grep, all you need top do is drop the qf from the beginning of the file name to get the mailq id of the EMail(s) you are after and run the above sendmail command against it.

Another problem you could potentially run into if your mailq starts to grow is the inability of grep to accept ‘grep <email address> qf*’ due to the amount of files in the directory causing grep to complain that there are to many arguments. A simple for loop can be used to get around this problem.

for i in `ls qf*`; do grep <email address> $i; done

This can be entered on the command line directly, no need to create a .sh file to run it from.

The Humble Bundle #3!

Well they call it number 3 but it is number 4 by my count. The real number 3 was called the Frozenbyte bundle which included a mix of completed and not so completed games so I would say strictly speaking was not a true or full humble bundle.

This new fully fledged Humble Indy Bundle contains:

Crayon Physics, Cogs, VVVVVV, HammerFight and And Yet It Moves.

I look forward to trying them out. I have previously purchased the other Humble Bundles and have yet to play all the games provided.

Not only do you get some damn good and very original Indie produced games but you also get to support some good causes when purchasing these bundles, not to mention support the people making these games and who put the effort into support Linux, Mac and Windows and as a Linux user, I definitely appreciate the effort. I would say I am not the only Linux user who does due to the fact that with all the previous Hunble Bundle, including this one, Linux users on average give 3 times more than the either Mac or Windows users.

So do yourself and your charity of choice a favour and grab yourself the Humble Bundle 3 before time runs out!

A new Bonus Game!

Since my initial posting, it looks like a new game has been added to the bundle which is available to anyone who has already paid for Humble Bundle 3. That game is Steel Storm which I am personally pretty happy about. I had recently played the demo and thought it was a good bit of fun.

Google Chrome Under Slackware64 13.37

I am one of those strange people who use Opera as their web browser (not to mention slackware as their OS), well at home, at work I generally use Firefox for some reason but I digress. So I was sitting there using Opera and thinking I wonder what would be involved getting Google Chrome running on my Slackware64 desktop. So I did a bit of Googling, as one does, to get an idea.

My first place of arrival was the Chrome web site which only provided 32 and 64bit versions in .deb and .rpm format.

My next port of call was this website. I went through the steps suggested and it all installed fine, making me pretty happy. I found the Chrome icon in my KDE menu under internet as it should be and ran it, causing the little Chrome icon to bounce merrily up and down next to my pointer. Unfortunately that was all it did which greatly deflated my joy. I then ran it from the command line to see what errors it might spit out at me and found that it was missing libgconf.

I fired up sbopkg, did a search for libgconf and installed it. As it was installing I also read somewhere it needed Orbit2 which I installed via sbopkg once it had installed libgconf.

All done, I ran Chrome again only to find it needed the PAM libraries. This I couldn’t find via sbopkg so back to Google I went again and found this website which informed me the package existed on the Slackware install DVD within the extra/google-chrome directory. Popped the install DVD into the drive and sure enough it was there, along with the other libraries I needed, grrrr.

The needed Libs

The needed libs for Google Chrome and Slackware

I also found a handful of other packages in this extras folder as well. Still, by using sbopkg, the version of libgconf is newer than the version on the CD.

To summaries  on getting Google Chrome running under Slackware64 v13.37 (yes, it is very leet!):

  • Install GConf “installpkg GConf-2.32.1-x86_64-1.txz”
  • Install ORbit2 “installpkg ORBit2-2.14.19-x86_64-1.txz”
  • Install PAM libs “installpkg google-chrome-pam-solibs-1.1.3-x86_64-1.txz”
  • Install Google Chrome as per this website.

 

Google Chrome working on Slackware64 13.37

The fruits of my labour, Google Chrome working under Slackware64 13.37

 

Should be Back on the Road Again…. I Hope.

Well, I finally got off my arse and organised for my bike to get picked up by a wreckers for some repairs. I am not looking forward to the cost but I can’t stand public transport any more and not having my own personal wheels when I need them.

I am also changing the tires while I am at it. The OEM tires that came with my CB400 were fine during summer but as soon as winter rolled around, I found them very slippery in the cold + wet, to the extent that the back wheel completely lost traction as I was coming out of a corner at ~25-30Km/h causing me to drop the bike thus the need for repairs.

Fingers crossed that it doesn’t send me completely broke to get it road worthy again. I should be getting the quote tomorrow sometime.

A quick search shows me I am not the only one finding themselves feeling this way about the tires:

Default Re: Dunlop Sportmax Q2

my current ride, when purchased new, came fitted with dunny roadsmarts. those tyres will kill you. the feel is like they are made from wood., polished shiny hardwood.

i did’nt get the Q2’s, maybe next time. i had a look at them, they are way sticky, softer than the pures, the rubber on the sides same as a track tyre. but i just went with power pures, tried and tested. won’t last long, but they’re worth it.

there is a disclaimer on Jake Wilson that excludes tyres from international shipping rates, below the table.

glad you guys got yours, but it is in the fine print.

via Dunlop Sportmax Q2 – Page 3 – Netrider Forums.

 

and yes I have to agree, that is exactly how they felt….